George Bernard Shaw, 1948 -by Adolf Morath  [+]

There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in.— George Bernard Shaw, On the Rocks

from liveauctioneers

George Bernard Shaw, 1948 -by Adolf Morath  [+]

There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in.
— George Bernard Shaw, On the Rocks

from liveauctioneers

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940
entregulistanybostan:

fuckyeahmanuscripts

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

entregulistanybostan:

fuckyeahmanuscripts

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait in the mirror, c1890  [+]

Technically good negatives are more often the result of the survival of the fittest than of special creation: the photographer is like the cod, which lays a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity.— George Bernard Shaw, cit. in ‘Man and Cameraman - revealing the photographic legacy of George Bernard Shaw' (LSE)

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait in the mirror, c1890  [+]

Technically good negatives are more often the result of the survival of the fittest than of special creation: the photographer is like the cod, which lays a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity.
— George Bernard Shaw, cit. in ‘Man and Cameraman - revealing the photographic legacy of George Bernard Shaw' (LSE)

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait experimenting with light, c1900  [+]
from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait experimenting with light, c1900  [+]

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw and his wife playing chess, ca 1907 -by Alfred Stieglitz
entregulistanybostan:

George Bernard Shaw y su esposa juegan ajedrez (ca 1907), por Alfred Stieglitz Biblioteca Beinecke, YaleArtejedrez

George Bernard Shaw and his wife playing chess, ca 1907 -by Alfred Stieglitz

entregulistanybostan:

George Bernard Shaw y su esposa juegan ajedrez (ca 1907), por Alfred Stieglitz
Biblioteca Beinecke, Yale
Artejedrez

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portraits 1899[prints by Frederick H. Evans]
via alinari

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portraits 1899
[prints by Frederick H. Evans]

via alinari

George Bernard Shaw, 1935 -by E.O. Hoppé
[one of my favorite portraits of Shaw…]
via corbis

George Bernard Shaw, 1935 -by E.O. Hoppé

[one of my favorite portraits of Shaw…]

via corbis

Playwright and author George Bernard Shaw talks with E.O. Hoppé, 1930 -by E.O. Hoppé
via corbis

Playwright and author George Bernard Shaw talks with E.O. Hoppé, 1930 -by E.O. Hoppé

via corbis

George Bernard Shaw, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt
so30s:

liquidnight:Alfred Eisenstaedt
“In 1932 I traveled to London hoping to photograph George Bernard Shaw. People told me he was very difficult and inaccessible, but I was also told that he was a vegetarian. So I bought a bunch of bananas and sent these, together with a portfolio of my photographs, to his home at Whitehall Court. Two days later I was asked to visit him. He looked through my photographs and said, “You don’t have to make me pose, I am a photographer myself.” Shaw was very friendly and did everything I wanted. I wish all people were so cooperative. He had a wonderful old Smith Premier typewriter. I remember it like yesterday. I even remember the house number—it was No. 4.”
From Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self-Portrait

George Bernard Shaw, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt

so30s:

liquidnight:Alfred Eisenstaedt

“In 1932 I traveled to London hoping to photograph George Bernard Shaw. People told me he was very difficult and inaccessible, but I was also told that he was a vegetarian. So I bought a bunch of bananas and sent these, together with a portfolio of my photographs, to his home at Whitehall Court. Two days later I was asked to visit him. He looked through my photographs and said, “You don’t have to make me pose, I am a photographer myself.” Shaw was very friendly and did everything I wanted. I wish all people were so cooperative. He had a wonderful old Smith Premier typewriter. I remember it like yesterday. I even remember the house number—it was No. 4.”

From Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self-Portrait

George Bernard Shaw on his balcony, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt
via icp

George Bernard Shaw on his balcony, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt

via icp

George Bernard Shaw, 1948 -by Adolf Morath  [+]

There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in.— George Bernard Shaw, On the Rocks

from liveauctioneers

George Bernard Shaw, 1948 -by Adolf Morath  [+]

There is the eternal war between those who are in the world for what they can get out of it and those who are in the world to make it a better place for everybody to live in.
— George Bernard Shaw, On the Rocks

from liveauctioneers

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940
entregulistanybostan:

fuckyeahmanuscripts

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

entregulistanybostan:

fuckyeahmanuscripts

Postcard sent from Virginia Woolf to George Bernard Shaw, 1940

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait in the mirror, c1890  [+]

Technically good negatives are more often the result of the survival of the fittest than of special creation: the photographer is like the cod, which lays a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity.— George Bernard Shaw, cit. in ‘Man and Cameraman - revealing the photographic legacy of George Bernard Shaw' (LSE)

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait in the mirror, c1890  [+]

Technically good negatives are more often the result of the survival of the fittest than of special creation: the photographer is like the cod, which lays a million eggs in order that one may reach maturity.
— George Bernard Shaw, cit. in ‘Man and Cameraman - revealing the photographic legacy of George Bernard Shaw' (LSE)

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait experimenting with light, c1900  [+]
from LSE

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portrait experimenting with light, c1900  [+]

from LSE

George Bernard Shaw and his wife playing chess, ca 1907 -by Alfred Stieglitz
entregulistanybostan:

George Bernard Shaw y su esposa juegan ajedrez (ca 1907), por Alfred Stieglitz Biblioteca Beinecke, YaleArtejedrez

George Bernard Shaw and his wife playing chess, ca 1907 -by Alfred Stieglitz

entregulistanybostan:

George Bernard Shaw y su esposa juegan ajedrez (ca 1907), por Alfred Stieglitz
Biblioteca Beinecke, Yale
Artejedrez

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portraits 1899[prints by Frederick H. Evans]
via alinari

George Bernard Shaw, Self-Portraits 1899
[prints by Frederick H. Evans]

via alinari

George Bernard Shaw, 1935 -by E.O. Hoppé
[one of my favorite portraits of Shaw…]
via corbis

George Bernard Shaw, 1935 -by E.O. Hoppé

[one of my favorite portraits of Shaw…]

via corbis

Playwright and author George Bernard Shaw talks with E.O. Hoppé, 1930 -by E.O. Hoppé
via corbis

Playwright and author George Bernard Shaw talks with E.O. Hoppé, 1930 -by E.O. Hoppé

via corbis

George Bernard Shaw, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt
so30s:

liquidnight:Alfred Eisenstaedt
“In 1932 I traveled to London hoping to photograph George Bernard Shaw. People told me he was very difficult and inaccessible, but I was also told that he was a vegetarian. So I bought a bunch of bananas and sent these, together with a portfolio of my photographs, to his home at Whitehall Court. Two days later I was asked to visit him. He looked through my photographs and said, “You don’t have to make me pose, I am a photographer myself.” Shaw was very friendly and did everything I wanted. I wish all people were so cooperative. He had a wonderful old Smith Premier typewriter. I remember it like yesterday. I even remember the house number—it was No. 4.”
From Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self-Portrait

George Bernard Shaw, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt

so30s:

liquidnight:Alfred Eisenstaedt

“In 1932 I traveled to London hoping to photograph George Bernard Shaw. People told me he was very difficult and inaccessible, but I was also told that he was a vegetarian. So I bought a bunch of bananas and sent these, together with a portfolio of my photographs, to his home at Whitehall Court. Two days later I was asked to visit him. He looked through my photographs and said, “You don’t have to make me pose, I am a photographer myself.” Shaw was very friendly and did everything I wanted. I wish all people were so cooperative. He had a wonderful old Smith Premier typewriter. I remember it like yesterday. I even remember the house number—it was No. 4.”

From Eisenstaedt on Eisenstaedt: A Self-Portrait

George Bernard Shaw on his balcony, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt
via icp

George Bernard Shaw on his balcony, London 1932 -by Alfred Eisenstaedt

via icp

About:

a little of this, a little of that...
Mostly photography, litterature, cinema...

The main point here is Photographic Portrait

You can reach me through the Question? box. Since I don't accept the Anonymous messages anymore, those who are not registered with tumblr. can leave a message to:
sam.chagalov [at] gmail [dot] com

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