Peter Lorre
theshipthatflew:

oldhollywood: “My trouble is that I try to cover a part entirely. When you do there’s the danger that the patron will leave the theatre feeling that you are so perfectly suited to the character he has just seen that he can’t imagine you in any other part.
…Mothers with children ran from me in the street. Terrible letters came to me. Letters came from strange people; people who I never believed lived in the world; depraved and disturbed minds, thinking they saw in me the perfect companion, a fellow psychopathic. A success can be too great, I tell you.”
-Peter Lorre, on his role in 1931’s M
(via)

Peter Lorre

theshipthatflew:

oldhollywood: “My trouble is that I try to cover a part entirely. When you do there’s the danger that the patron will leave the theatre feeling that you are so perfectly suited to the character he has just seen that he can’t imagine you in any other part.

…Mothers with children ran from me in the street. Terrible letters came to me. Letters came from strange people; people who I never believed lived in the world; depraved and disturbed minds, thinking they saw in me the perfect companion, a fellow psychopathic. A success can be too great, I tell you.”

-Peter Lorre, on his role in 1931’s M

(via)

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh
[version on vote…]
via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh

[version on vote…]

via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh
[version on vote…]
via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh

[version on vote…]

via LAC

Ferdinand Bruckner Arriving in Los Angeles, July 15 1936Welcoming him: Ernst Lubitsch (at his right) and Peter Lorre.

Original caption: Ferdinand Bruckner, Austrian playwright whose play “The Private Life of Napoleon” will be presented on Broadway this fall with Peter Lorre playing the title role, arrived in Los Angeles, California, July 14, to confer with Lorre regarding the casting and final production arrangements for the play. At the train with Lorre to welcome Bruckner to Hollywod was Ernst Lubitsch, who is negotiating with Bruckner regarding a possible writing contract. LtoR: Ernst Lubitsch, Ferdinand Bruckner and Peter Lorre.

via corbis

Ferdinand Bruckner Arriving in Los Angeles, July 15 1936
Welcoming him: Ernst Lubitsch (at his right) and Peter Lorre.

Original caption: Ferdinand Bruckner, Austrian playwright whose play “The Private Life of Napoleon” will be presented on Broadway this fall with Peter Lorre playing the title role, arrived in Los Angeles, California, July 14, to confer with Lorre regarding the casting and final production arrangements for the play. At the train with Lorre to welcome Bruckner to Hollywod was Ernst Lubitsch, who is negotiating with Bruckner regarding a possible writing contract. LtoR: Ernst Lubitsch, Ferdinand Bruckner and Peter Lorre.

via corbis

Peter Lorre
theshipthatflew:

oldhollywood: “My trouble is that I try to cover a part entirely. When you do there’s the danger that the patron will leave the theatre feeling that you are so perfectly suited to the character he has just seen that he can’t imagine you in any other part.
…Mothers with children ran from me in the street. Terrible letters came to me. Letters came from strange people; people who I never believed lived in the world; depraved and disturbed minds, thinking they saw in me the perfect companion, a fellow psychopathic. A success can be too great, I tell you.”
-Peter Lorre, on his role in 1931’s M
(via)

Peter Lorre

theshipthatflew:

oldhollywood: “My trouble is that I try to cover a part entirely. When you do there’s the danger that the patron will leave the theatre feeling that you are so perfectly suited to the character he has just seen that he can’t imagine you in any other part.

…Mothers with children ran from me in the street. Terrible letters came to me. Letters came from strange people; people who I never believed lived in the world; depraved and disturbed minds, thinking they saw in me the perfect companion, a fellow psychopathic. A success can be too great, I tell you.”

-Peter Lorre, on his role in 1931’s M

(via)

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh
[version on vote…]
via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh

[version on vote…]

via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh
[version on vote…]
via LAC

Peter Lorre, California, Feb. 1946 -by Yousuf Karsh

[version on vote…]

via LAC

Ferdinand Bruckner Arriving in Los Angeles, July 15 1936Welcoming him: Ernst Lubitsch (at his right) and Peter Lorre.

Original caption: Ferdinand Bruckner, Austrian playwright whose play “The Private Life of Napoleon” will be presented on Broadway this fall with Peter Lorre playing the title role, arrived in Los Angeles, California, July 14, to confer with Lorre regarding the casting and final production arrangements for the play. At the train with Lorre to welcome Bruckner to Hollywod was Ernst Lubitsch, who is negotiating with Bruckner regarding a possible writing contract. LtoR: Ernst Lubitsch, Ferdinand Bruckner and Peter Lorre.

via corbis

Ferdinand Bruckner Arriving in Los Angeles, July 15 1936
Welcoming him: Ernst Lubitsch (at his right) and Peter Lorre.

Original caption: Ferdinand Bruckner, Austrian playwright whose play “The Private Life of Napoleon” will be presented on Broadway this fall with Peter Lorre playing the title role, arrived in Los Angeles, California, July 14, to confer with Lorre regarding the casting and final production arrangements for the play. At the train with Lorre to welcome Bruckner to Hollywod was Ernst Lubitsch, who is negotiating with Bruckner regarding a possible writing contract. LtoR: Ernst Lubitsch, Ferdinand Bruckner and Peter Lorre.

via corbis

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